Probate Bills Move Forward

Last Wednesday, in hearing room A-1 of the State House, the Judiciary Committee heard public testimony on 164 bills related to the broadly defined category of “crimes.”  Spanning the better part of the afternoon, the testimony addressed issues ranging from Governor Patrick’s high-profile gun crime bill to reinstating the death penalty to strengthening animal abuse laws.

Meanwhile, upstairs on the floor of the House, the details of a supplemental budget appropriation, which included $12 million in direct funds and $8 million in retained revenue fee collections for the Trial Court, was taken up and passed with a vote of 149-1.

While the supplemental budget and the crime bills captured the headlines the next day, the Judiciary Committee polled its members on the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code (MUPC) technical corrections bill and the Massachusetts Uniform Trust Code (MUTC).  Both bills were ultimately reported out of committee favorably today.  These two pieces of legislation have been at the forefront of the BBA’s public policy agenda for years and represent the culmination of the efforts of task forces and a significant number of stakeholders.  We are encouraged that both bills have begun to move, particularly during such a busy and pressure-filled week for the legislature.

As of today, just 80 days remain until the estates portion of the MUPC takes effect; the guardianship portion became effective on July 1, 2009.  A delay in passing both the MUPC technical corrections and the MUTC legislation will result in unnecessary compliance costs, while also putting greater strain on an already overburdened Probate & Family Court.  The Court has been working around the clock to prepare for the implementation of the MUPC and any delays will only undermine their efforts to achieve a smooth transition.

Both bills address some of the shortcomings of the Commonwealth’s current trusts and estates statutes.  Although the two pieces of legislation are neither flashy nor easy to explain to non-lawyers, both are much-needed, commonsense measures seeking to ensure that soundness and equity prevail in Massachusetts law.  It is critically important to the bench, bar and the public that the legislature acts soon.

- Kathleen Joyce

Government Relations Director

Boston Bar Association

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