Monthly Archives: April 2011

Diverting Money From an Already Underfunded Program

Within two days of the House of Representatives budget being released, 758 amendments were filed.  Amendments add money to favored programs, make policy changes or even earmark or divert funds from one thing to another.  Earmarks sometimes have absolutely no relevance to a line item, and often reflect unique district priorities.  One amendment in particular caught the BBA’s attention.

Amendment #243 would have diverted $100,000 of the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation’s (MLAC) appropriation for a study on grandparents raising grandchildren.  While that issue is worthy, the explicit designation of funds is the wrong way to go about it.  In our view, pulling essential resources from an already underfunded line item makes for bad public policy.  Always a vocal and public leader for legal aid, the BBA voiced its opposition for two key reasons:

  • The Amendment would have reduced funding for legal aid at a time when legal aid programs are forced to turn away nearly 50% of the people who seek services due to inadequate resources.  A reduction of any amount would exacerbate these circumstances.
  • Carving away at MLAC funding would have set a bad precedent for other groups, who  also have legitimate needs.

After all of the work to get level funding in the House budget, Amendment #243 would have undermined our efforts to secure much needed support for legal aid.

-Kathleen Joyce

Government Relations Director

BostonBar Association

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Alimony Reform . . . Seeing the Light at the End of the Tunnel

At its April meeting, the BBA Council voted to support S 665, “An Act to Reform and Improve Alimony,” co-sponsored by Senator Gale Candaras and Representative John Fernandes.  This bill, the result of a Herculean effort led by the Legislative Alimony Reform Task Force, is the result of thoughtful discussion and negotiation.  The final product provides a structure that gives durational and amount limits to alimony orders while giving the court the ability to consider the facts and circumstances of each case, which is key to preserving judicial discretion within the framework of reform.  Our Family Law Section has taken it one step further and has provided additional comments for the Legislature to consider.

The Legislative Alimony Reform Task Force was convened to bring all parties with an interest in alimony reform together in one room to collaborate on a single, compromise piece of legislation. The Task Force constituted one of the broadest groups of family law stakeholders possible, including Chief Justice Paula Carey of the Probate and Family Court in an advisory capacity, and representatives from the BBA, the Massachusetts Bar Association, the Women’s Bar Association, father’s rights groups and private family law practitioners.  Members met for marathon sessions over fourteen months under strict confidentiality  —  trudging through various alimony reform proposals already in existence and working together on each piece of the new legislation.  The BBA’s Family Law co-chair, Kelly Leighton, acted as the BBA’s liaison throughout the process.

The call to reform alimony laws in Massachusetts has gotten louder and louder over the last several years.  These laws have a direct impact on the lives and livelihoods of so many people throughout the Commonwealth.  The current laws give little discretion to judges to set a termination date on alimony payments absent a significant change in the lives of the two parties. Often there is little consistency in alimony rulings because of the ambiguities in the current statutes.

We aren’t the first group calling for change in this area of the law, and it was only after our collaboration with other groups that it appears Massachusetts will finally benefit from legislative reform.  Our work on this started years ago, when the BBA and the MBA convened a joint task force to study the alimony issue and make recommendations.  In 2010 the BBA endorsed the report of that joint task force, which was utilized in the drafting of “An Act to Reform and Improve Alimony.”

Although the alimony reform process may still take some time, it certainly looks like Massachusetts will finally have an alimony system which is consistent while allowing for judicial discretion.  Legislators rely on groups like the BBA to help frame issues in a way that can bring about meaningful change.  The next step in the process is to weigh in publicly with our support when the Judiciary Committee schedules a public hearing on this issue.

-Kathleen Joyce

Government Relations Director

Boston Bar Association

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Legal Services Scores Huge Victory in the House Budget

THANK YOU to the Massachusetts House of Representatives for level funding the line item for the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation (MLAC) at $9.5 million.  Yesterday the House Ways & Means Committee unveiled its annual budget.  Because of the $1.9 billion gap between spending and available revenues, there were deep cuts to virtually all areas of government.  Level funding at a time when things like health care, local aid, education, and human services are being cut is an enormous victory.

In the days and even the hours leading up to the release of the budget, advocacy groups searched hard for signals that might forecast what would happen to the line items on which the survival of their programs depends.  Of course there were last minute meetings and phone calls to implore legislators to make legal services one of their key priorities.  But in the days leading up to the release of the budget, advocacy groups also had to think seriously about contingency plans in the event of cuts in funding.

State budgets translate into statements about values.  For the House Ways & Means Committee to level fund legal services in the midst of widespread cuts to other important programs sends a powerful message that the members of the House understand the importance of providing equal justice for all.  Now the Senate is on deck.  While the Senate is reviewing the recommendations in the House proposal, please take a moment to contact your state representative and say thank you for supporting legal services.  Make another phone call and ask your state senator to support legal services and the MLAC line item.  With the Governor and now the House supporting level funding for legal services, things certainly look promising.  But the need for advocacy continues.

-Kathleen Joyce

Government Relations Director

Boston Bar Association

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Here Comes the House Budget. . . Now What?

When all is said and done, what is the cost of trying to provide access to justice for all?

Next Wednesday, April 13th, the Massachusetts House of Representatives will release its version of the state budget.  The budget is much more than a list of dollar figures for particular programs. Rather it’s actually a reflection of decisions that help frame the values and priorities for the state.  The decisions reflected in the state budget affect the everyday lives of Massachusetts residents and have a strong bearing on the quality of education in Massachusetts, the level of health care services, safety of communities and so much more.

The budget is the most important bill to move through the Legislature each year.  The BBA has been working for months to advocate for level funding for legal services and the state courts while continuing to urge adequate funding for CPCS and the District Attorneys as well. To be an effective advocate, it is important to understand how and when to make an impact on the process, and ultimately the outcome.  This means knowing what to look for when the budget is posted online next week and how to respond.

Our 3 step state budget review process is:

1) Check the line items for the specific accounts the BBA has been working on.  For example, we are hoping to see that the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation line item 0321-1600 will be level funded at $9.5 million.

2) Check the language of the line items for any earmarks.  Earmarks sometimes appear in a budget item and direct a portion of the money to a particular program.

3) Read the outside sections.  These sections often affect appropriations in the budget or contain policy that would make permanent changes in the General Laws.

The BBA has been anticipating the release of the budget.  For the past two months, we have been campaigning alongside our partners at the Equal Justice Coalition for adequate funding for legal services.  We have been working closely with the Judiciary to determine how best we can help them make their case that adequate funding for the courts is essential to everyone in Massachusetts.  BBA sections have reviewed and studied the proposal relative to the Probation Department and CPCS that was included in the Governor’s budget.  We know that the Governor’s transfer of CPCS to the Executive Branch means those line items have been stricken from the Judiciary accounts.  But public statements from the Speaker indicate the House budget will keep CPCS in the Judiciary.

 No, we’re not done.  Once the House budget is released, we will analyze the priorities articulated and develop an appropriate response.  For the BBA to make an impact on the budget process we have an obligation to speak up in support of our partners and serve as a resource for the growing number of legislators who are not as familiar with some of these issues as they might like.

-Kathleen Joyce

Government Relations Director

Boston Bar Association

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