Tag Archives: legislature

Chief Justice Roderick Ireland: Modernization and Collaboration

With Chief Justice Roderick Ireland’s recent announcement of his July 25th retirement from the bench, we wanted to take the opportunity to reflect on the momentous progress our courts have made during his time as the Chief Justice.  Chief Justice Ireland has left an indelible mark by expanding and enhancing the relationship between the judiciary and our state legislature. 

In 2010, Chief Justice Ireland became the first African-American Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court.  From the beginning, he worked closely with the legislature, building bridges and developing relationships that have become real friendships.  A testament to this relationship is obvious to any visitor at his Speaker DeLeo’s office.  Both men proudly display pictures of the two of them together in their respective offices.  

Chief Justice Ireland’s leadership has always been impressive, and the way he has reached out to court employees is truly remarkable.  During his tenure, he made a point of visiting courthouses to thank court employees for their hard work.  He has done more than just boost morale for court employees; Chief Justice Ireland has been committed to improving the court system for the average person while demystifying the entire courtroom experience.  

In 2011, working with Chief Justice Ireland, the legislature passed court reorganization legislation.  This law brought about the most comprehensive overhaul of the Massachusetts judiciary since the Court Reorganization Act of 1978.  It established the Office of Court Management under a newly created Court Administrator position who works in tandem with the Chief Justice of the Trial Court.  Shortly after its enactment, Paula Carey was named Chief Justice of the Trial Court and Harry Spence became the first Court Administrator for the Trial Court. 

The Courts have done well under Chief Justice Ireland and the legislature has remained supportive of the judiciary including a recent – and long overdue – pay raise last summer.  In his roughly three and one-half years as Chief Justice, Roderick Ireland has made a lasting impression on the judiciary and every person who uses our courts on a daily basis. 

His tireless efforts working with all branches of government have resulted in unprecedented reforms for the judiciary and lasting goodwill within the other branches of government, especially the legislature.  The Trial Court has emerged with a more streamlined and strong administrative structure, and judicial salaries are now more competitive than they have been in nearly a decade.  We are pleased to celebrate the remarkable accomplishments of Chief Justice Ireland and look forward to the next Chief Justice continuing his full government collaboration.

– Kathleen Joyce
Government Relations Director
Boston Bar Association
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Behind Our Public Policy Focus

The Massachusetts Legislature handles thousands of bills every session, and the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts frequently solicits amicus briefs.  In addition there are countless opportunities for comments on rule making and rules changes at the state and federal level.  Making a meaningful impact demands that we focus our public policy efforts.

We trace our roots back to the John Adams who defended the British soldiers charged in the Boston Massacre, and have tried to remain true to those roots.  Hence we focus our public policy efforts on issues directly relating to access to justice, the administration of justice, the practice of law, and improving the quality of laws in the Commonwealth.

Admittedly, we often field requests to lend the prestige of the Boston Bar Association to groups dealing with worthy issues unrelated to our mission. While providing such an “endorsement” might win us a pat on the back from people we admire or even make us feel good about ourselves, the reality is that such activities can dilute our message and squander our political capital.

We want to be known as the bar association that steps forward to advocate for adequate funding for legal aid, our State Courts, District Attorneys’ Offices, and indigent criminal defense services.  We also want to be known as the bar association that cares about drafting legislation that will work the way it was intended.  So it is that even after the formal session has ended, we continue to advocate zealously for technical changes to the soon-to-be enacted Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code.

We have a volunteer talent pool as wide as it is deep, and are uniquely positioned to lend our expertise on issues where we as lawyers can make a unique contribution based on our skill sets and experience.  But we want to leverage this talent wisely in ways that can provide the greatest value.

Government Relations Department
Boston Bar Association
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Legislators Who Understand Need for Legal Aid

For many years the BBA has advocated alongside Greater Boston Legal Services (GBLS) for the Massachusetts Legal Aid Corporation line item, which is the state funding source for civil legal aid to poor people.  In meetings at the State House we are typically joined by a client of GBLS who is also a constituent of the particular lawmaker with whom we are meeting.  This puts a human face on the funding request.  More important, the constituents’ personal stories provide real life illustrations of the difference that legal services attorneys make on the lives of people facing desperate legal problems.

Let me tell you about once such meeting last year.  It was the first time we had met with Speaker Pro Tempore Patricia Haddad, whose district is in Southeast Massachusetts (Dighton, Somerset, Swansea and Taunton).  We brought along a low-income grandmother whose story would be familiar to any legal services lawyer trying to secure visitation rights to a grandchild whose parent is out of the picture.

We spoke with Rep. Haddad for over an hour.  We rattled off numbers and talked about the decline in IOLTA funds, the number of layoffs statewide in legal services, how legal services actually brings money into the state, and how the private bar does its part too by volunteering pro bono hours and raising private money for legal services.  But it was the real life story of the constituent that generated the greatest impact.

Rep. Haddad said she was glad we came to talk with her about this important issue.  Her sincerity was confirmed only a few days later when we ran into her in the reception area of Speaker DeLeo’s office.  She told us she was there for the same reason: to discuss legal services funding with the Speaker.

Tonight we get the opportunity to thank Rep. Haddad, along with Chairman Stephen M. Brewer (Senate Ways & Means), Chairwoman Cynthia Stone Creem (Joint Judiciary Committee), Chairman Brian S. Dempsey (House Ways & Means Committee), and Steven A. Tolman (President of the AFL-CIO and former Senator).

Happily, the Massachusetts Bar Association and the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation, our partners in the Equal Justice Coalition, will be joining us for a recognition reception.  With the Legislature in informal session until January, this is a great opportunity to honor some of the legislative leaders who have demonstrated an outstanding commitment to civil legal aid in 2011.

The State House has already begun to prepare for the FY13 budget cycle.  We hope at this time next year we will be in a similar position: thanking those who made MLAC’s $14.5 million for FY13 request a reality.

-Kathleen Joyce
Director of Government Relations
Boston Bar Association
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Mid-Session Legislative Update

The Legislature’s winter recess began last Wednesday evening – but not before some important pieces of legislation passed in both the House and Senate.  The reason for the winter recess?  Legislative rules require the House and Senate to break from formal session during non-election years as a way of preventing action on major bills so close to the holidays, a time during which the public may not be as attentive.  If two-thirds of members agree, the Legislature can return to session during their scheduled break.  This recess gives legislators time to spend in their districts and affords others a chance to do additional lobbying on bills expected to move next year.  Here’s a quick update on the progress of transgender civil rights, sentencing reform and important trusts and estates bills that the BBA is working on…

A victory for transgender rights!  When the House and Senate approved a bill to include gender identity and expression in the Commonwealth’s nondiscrimination statute and existing hate crime laws, Massachusetts joined 15 other states – along with Washington, D.C. – that already provide these protections for transgender people.  Governor Patrick, who supports the legislation, is expected to sign the bill soon.   While the final version of the Transgender Equal Rights Bill does not include protections within public accommodations, this is a historic and important victory for transgender equality in Massachusetts.

We have more work to do on sentencing reform. We had hoped that a bill denying parole for repeat violent offenders would also eliminate mandatory minimum drug sentences for non-violent offenders. While we were pleased to see some elements of sentencing reform in the Senate version of the bill, we were disappointed that the House version only contained parole denial for repeat offenders.  We’re still hoping that a conference committee will be able to restore the Senate reforms relative to reduced mandatory minimum drug sentences.

Having just passed the midpoint of the 2011-2012 session, legislative rules now require that bills pending at the end of the first annual session carry over into the second annual session.  But let’s not forget that the portion of the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code dealing with estates goes into effect on January 2, 2012. Two important housekeeping proposals, the MUPC technical corrections and the Massachusetts Uniform Trust Code, are still pending and we cannot wait until the beginning of the next session to act.   A delay in passing these bills will put greater strain on an already overburdened Probate & Family Court.

While the House and Senate will continue to meet over the next few weeks in informal sessions, the second leg of the 2011-2012 begins in January and will continue until through July.

-Kathleen Joyce
Government Relations Director
Boston Bar Association
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Here Comes the House Budget. . . Now What?

When all is said and done, what is the cost of trying to provide access to justice for all?

Next Wednesday, April 13th, the Massachusetts House of Representatives will release its version of the state budget.  The budget is much more than a list of dollar figures for particular programs. Rather it’s actually a reflection of decisions that help frame the values and priorities for the state.  The decisions reflected in the state budget affect the everyday lives of Massachusetts residents and have a strong bearing on the quality of education in Massachusetts, the level of health care services, safety of communities and so much more.

The budget is the most important bill to move through the Legislature each year.  The BBA has been working for months to advocate for level funding for legal services and the state courts while continuing to urge adequate funding for CPCS and the District Attorneys as well. To be an effective advocate, it is important to understand how and when to make an impact on the process, and ultimately the outcome.  This means knowing what to look for when the budget is posted online next week and how to respond.

Our 3 step state budget review process is:

1) Check the line items for the specific accounts the BBA has been working on.  For example, we are hoping to see that the Massachusetts Legal Assistance Corporation line item 0321-1600 will be level funded at $9.5 million.

2) Check the language of the line items for any earmarks.  Earmarks sometimes appear in a budget item and direct a portion of the money to a particular program.

3) Read the outside sections.  These sections often affect appropriations in the budget or contain policy that would make permanent changes in the General Laws.

The BBA has been anticipating the release of the budget.  For the past two months, we have been campaigning alongside our partners at the Equal Justice Coalition for adequate funding for legal services.  We have been working closely with the Judiciary to determine how best we can help them make their case that adequate funding for the courts is essential to everyone in Massachusetts.  BBA sections have reviewed and studied the proposal relative to the Probation Department and CPCS that was included in the Governor’s budget.  We know that the Governor’s transfer of CPCS to the Executive Branch means those line items have been stricken from the Judiciary accounts.  But public statements from the Speaker indicate the House budget will keep CPCS in the Judiciary.

 No, we’re not done.  Once the House budget is released, we will analyze the priorities articulated and develop an appropriate response.  For the BBA to make an impact on the budget process we have an obligation to speak up in support of our partners and serve as a resource for the growing number of legislators who are not as familiar with some of these issues as they might like.

-Kathleen Joyce

Government Relations Director

Boston Bar Association

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We’re Making Progress in Debt Collection Reform

As a membership organization with nearly 10,000 members, issues of public policy and opportunities to comment and suggest reforms routinely present themselves to the Boston Bar Association (BBA).  The BBA Council has adopted policy positions on a wide variety of issues.  Once a position has been approved, many of our members wonder, “What now?”

The answer usually depends on timing – the timing of Council approval in relation to what the Legislature is focusing on at that particular moment.  The salience of an issue often dictates how much traction it will have in the Legislature and other governmental agencies.  Unfortunately, forecasting what will capture the attention of government officials is more of an art than a science.  So advancing BBA positions demands patience and perseverance.

Just one example. . .When word came to the BBA last Friday that the Attorney General was submitting proposed updates to its Debt Collection Regulations to provide stronger consumer protections, we were thrilled.  As noted in Issue Spot last August, the BBA’s Consumer Finance Committee wrote a report proposing updates to the current regulations to reflect the real world today.

Many of the proposed updates submitted by the BBA group are found in the proposal submitted by the Attorney General’s Office.  These changes will provide substantial relief for debtors that have been subjected to unfair collection practices not covered by the current regulations.

Before the regulations are updated, there is a comment period and a hearing scheduled on May 18th.  Members of the BBA Consumer Finance Committee will present testimony on the Attorney General’s proposal to express the BBA’s support for these important modernizations of debt collection practices.  The BBA is proud to work with the Attorney General’s Office and all other agencies where the expertise of our membership can be useful.

-Kathleen Joyce

Government Relations Director

Boston Bar Association

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It’s That Time of Year Again

As people race to finish holiday shopping, there’s a growing curiosity about which bills in the legislature will actually make it all the way to the governor’s desk during the session’s final weeks.  With one eye on our current bills and where they are during the informal sessions, we’ve also begun taking a hard look at our legislative priorities for the next session. 

This process started months ago and probably won’t be completed until January.  The BBA has been reviewing our portfolio of bills that we’ve filed in the past and determining whether or not the issues are still timely and important. For those that make the cut, we must take a careful look to ensure that the language in the bill still reflects the reforms we sought. 

The BBA’s issues are varied and far reaching; including everything from complicated tax issues to criminal justice reforms to family law matters and consumer protection, so the input and expertise of our member volunteers is crucial.  The goal is to present complete, up-to-date, and meaningful legislation that will have real world, positive impacts on the citizens of the Commonwealth and practitioners of the law.

Some bills are time sensitive and require immediate action.  Other bills get filed each session until we are able to focus enough of the legislature’s attention on them at just the right time.  For example, legislation updating the Homestead exemption and creating the Massachusetts Uniform Probate Code took many years to become law. 

An example going forward is our bill that would update the dollar amounts in Massachusetts for bankruptcy exemptions.  In 2004, amid concerns that the new federal bankruptcy law would make it harder for people to seek bankruptcy relief, and that under Massachusetts’ obsolete exemption statute, debtors are vulnerable to losing the very tools that allow them to earn a living, the BBA began to work on updating the state exemption statute.  Tying the dollar amounts in the statute to cost of living adjustments was just the beginning.  Our proposal also recognizes the need for things like computers, sophisticated and specialized power tools, and automobiles as items necessary for earning a living today.   It is critical to update the exemptions to ensure they are relevant to the real world in which we live.

Generally speaking, the exemptions remain unchanged until someone summons the energy to introduce and pass a bill increasing them – and in Massachusetts this hasn’t been done in over 30 years.  While there is no mechanism by which these exemptions are regularly reviewed and other reforms are needed as well, updating the personal exemption statute will be an important step in helping a very vulnerable population.

When legislation is filed, many of the volunteers that work on it have visions of attending a grand signing ceremony in a large community hall.  They imagine getting commemorative pens from the governor, along with cameras flashing from a full press corps.  But what usually happens is that bills fortunate enough to make it to the governor’s desk are rarely ever afforded any media coverage.  Instead most become law quietly without much notice. 

-Kathleen Joyce

Government Relations Director

Boston Bar Association

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