Tag Archives: Senator William Brownsberger

Senate Budget Update

The Senate Ways & Means Committee released its budget this week.  Read our budget breakdown here.  Here’s what we are watching in the Senate budget:

  • MLAC was level funded at $13 million; this is $4 million below their request of $17 million.  Senator William Brownsberger and Senator Cynthia Creem are filing an amendment requesting an increase of this budget line to $17 million.
  • The Trial Court received approximately $617 million, which is about $9 million more than the House budget.  This difference will have to be worked out in a budget conference committee.
  • CPCS received approximately $180 million.  While this funding amount is substantially higher than the funding it received in 2013, the final FY 2014 General Appropriations Act, and this year’s FY2015 House budget recommendation, it falls short of CPCS’s budget request.  This amount does not provide any additional funding for increased attorney compensation.  Several legislators are considering filing amendments to increase this line item.

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Statehouse Update

It’s been quite a busy week at the Statehouse and we’ve been there through it all – committee hearings, legislation, and the release of the House Ways & Means budget.  The Judiciary Committee resumed its work with back-to-back meetings on Tuesday and Wednesday covering probate issues — domestic relations and custody on day 1 and trusts and estates issues on day 2.  Despite lacking a House chair, the hearings were aptly run by Senator William Brownsberger and House Vice Chair Christopher M. Markey.  Representatives from the BBA testified at both meetings in front of packed hearing rooms. 

ImageAt the April 8th hearing, the Family Law Section had a number of bills of interest and Brad Bedingfield spoke on H1
540
, a bill to amend the adopted children’s law.  The change is related to a case for which the BBA filed an amicus brief, Rachel A. Bird Anderson v. BNY Mellon, N.A., et al.  This case concerned whether adopted children had the same rights as biological children to inheritance under wills written before 1958.  The brief urged the SJC to clarify the applicable estate planning laws after a dispute arose due to the retroactive application of amendments to a 1958 law.  The court held that 1958 law applied, avoiding radical change and affirming practitioners’ expectations.  Bedingfield testified in support of the bill, which further clarifies applicability of the later adopted amendments.  Legislative action would help to avoid confusion and possible litigation related to the Bird decision. 

On the April 9th, a panel led by BBA Council member Deborah J. Manus testified on S705, a bill which would revise the current spousal elective share law.  She noted that current law can produce strange and seemingly random outcomes that are often unfair.  For example, Manus noted the new bill would help avoid gamesmanship such as ordering monetary transfers from one’s deathbed in order to disinherit a spouse.  The bill, which is presented after 8 years of study by the BBA, MBA, and WBA, proposes to bring this portion of the law in line with the Uniform Probate Code.  Most of Massachusetts and other states’ probate laws are already aligned with these uniform laws.   

Image We will continue to track these bills as they move through the legislative process. 

– Jonathan Schreiber
Legislative and Public Policy Manager
Boston Bar Association
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Statehouse Update

This week both Governor Patrick and Speaker DeLeo outlined their priorities for the upcoming year.  In his final State of the Commonwealth on Tuesday night, Governor Patrick emphasized investments in education, innovation, and infrastructure. 

The next day, Speaker DeLeo addressed the entire House of Representatives, listing an increase in minimum wage coupled with business-friendly reforms, stricter gun control laws, and a domestic violence bill as three of his top issues. 

As we focus on legislative and budget activities at the Statehouse it’s important to realize that although this legislative term may appear uneventful from the outside, it has been full of activity.  Even without high-profile debates on big-issue bills there’s a lot going on. 

Take for instance, the fact that there has been an unprecedented amount of turnover in elected officials and leadership positions.  Recently, long time House Chair of the Joint Committee on the Judiciary, Representative Eugene O’Flaherty, announced his resignation to become corporation counsel to Boston Mayor Martin Walsh.  This leaves the House chairmanship open.  Meanwhile, Senator William Brownsberger has only held the Senate chairmanship of the Judiciary Committee for a matter of weeks. 

Other leadership positions currently vacant include the House second assistant majority leader and the chairmanship of the House Ethics Committee.  These positions will all be filled in the coming weeks.

Legislatively, the statehouse is poised to take action on a number of laws.  Significant bills addressing welfare reform, compounding pharmacies, and veterans services remain in conference committees.  Just last week, a group of lawmakers held a press conference in support of a juvenile justice bill comply with the Supreme Judicial Court’s ruling in Diatchenko.  The bill requires that juveniles convicted of first degree murder serve 35 years before parole eligibility. 

From a budget perspective – the Governor’s budget has been released and we now turn our attention to the House and Senate as they develop their budget numbers.  The House Ways & Means Budget will come first in early April, followed by House and Senate budgets in the following months.  A final budget will be ready by July 1st

All in all, every indication points to a very eventful next few months as staffing and leadership positions are filled and legislation and budget discussions come to the fore.     

– Jonathan Schreiber
Legislative and Public Policy Manager
Boston Bar Association
Comments are disabled for this blog. To submit your comments please e-mail  issuespot@bostonbar.org

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